PARMA Recordings Summer 2019 Call for Scores: An Introduction

It’s that time again—late summer has arrived, and the next PARMA Call for Scores season is on its heels. It’s time to sharpen pencils, polish up the finishing touches on scores, and think about where and when your music could be reaching listeners.

Our Call for Scores program has been bringing countless selections of music to life over the years. This summer, for the first time ever, we’re offering a full pre-submission period sneak peek into who’s a part of the Call this year. We’re inviting you in to meet the ensembles in this Call, as well as the unique submission opportunity which we’re offering for the very first time this year. 

So without further ado, meet the musicians of this Call.


Works for orchestra with or without soloists will be considered for recording with one of today’s premier orchestras, based in a country known for its talent, innovation, and dedication to the arts as a part of culture and daily life. The Royal Scottish National Orchestra, formed in 1891 as the Scottish Orchestra, became the Scottish National Orchestra in 1950, and was awarded Royal Patronage in 1977. Throughout its history, the Orchestra has played an integral part in Scotland’s musical life, including performing at the opening ceremony of the Scottish Parliament building in 2004. 

The RSNO performs across Scotland, including concerts in Glasgow, Edinburgh, Dundee, Aberdeen, Perth, and Inverness. The Orchestra appears regularly at the Edinburgh International Festival, the BBC Proms at London’s Royal Albert Hall and the St Magnus Festival, Orkney, and has made recent tours to the United States, Spain, France, China, and Germany. The RSNO has a worldwide reputation for the quality of its over 200 releases, receiving two Diapason d’Or de l’année awards for Symphonic Music, and eight GRAMMY Award nominations.


«Dream» Ergon Ensemble.Χώρος. Αίθουσα Banquet,19 Φεβρουαρίου 2015.

In the realm of chamber music, PARMA is featuring one of Greece’s newest and most exciting chamber ensembles. Ergon is an Athens-based contemporary music ensemble created in 2008 for performing works by living composers as well as masterpieces of 20th and 21st-century avant-garde music. Noted for its exciting interpretations and meticulous preparation, it has received praise from critics and audiences alike, making it the leading ensemble of its kind in Greece. An extremely flexible and versatile ensemble, Ergon is based on a core formation that is further reinforced, depending on the project, by a great number of guests and exceptionally talented musicians. 

Directed by a five-member musician team, responsible for planning and collaborations, Ergon’s original and adventurous programming includes chamber and orchestral music, musical theater works, dance, contemporary opera, and cinema. 


While you’re making the final edits to your scores, we also invite artists to dust off any live recordings and bring them back to life with the third category in the Call for Scores: the call for live recordings. The live performance is special. The energy captured in the recording of these performances gives life to the listening experience in a way that stands out from studio recordings. With the Call for Live Recordings, PARMA is proud to bring these harnessed moments of the musical past into the present, with all the elements that make them unique as living, breathing performances. Selected recordings will be edited by PARMA’s post-production team and released under one of the PARMA labels.

[Albums above, left to right: Mark John McEncroe’s LIVE IN OSTRAVA; Michael G. Cunningham’s ECUMENICAL SPIRIT]


So now that you know who’s participating, it’s time for the details. The Call will officially open for submissions on August 9 for all current PARMA artists, and August 16 for all other artists. Please visit the Call for Scores page on the PARMA website or email info@parmarecordings.com for more information and the submission sheet.

We look forward to receiving your music!

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